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Hospital Design Reduces Likelihood Of Infections [Pics]

The hall-free structure of Butaro Hospital in Rwanda helps prevent the spread of disease.

Leah Gonzalez
Leah Gonzalez on April 16, 2013. @leahgonz

The Butaro Hospital in the Burera District in Rwanda was designed to alleviate the risk of the spread of infection among patients. Poor ventilation and cramped hallways contribute to the spread of disease in many medical facilities. As a solution, the MASS Design Group in collaboration with experts and specialists from Partners in Health, a non-profit healthcare organization, and the Harvard Medical School designed a structure that can reduce the spread of disease.

The result is a medical facility that doesn’t have hallways. Wards are located in separate buildings and all around are open walkways and loggias. The hospital also uses natural cross-ventilation, further reducing the risk of infections and significantly cutting energy costs. Inside the wards, beds are set against a half-built wall in the center of the room and patients face the windows.

Butaro-Hospital-4 Butaro-Hospital-2

Instead of hiring large contractors, locals were trained and employed for the construction of the hospital. Many parts of the hospital were built with volcanic rocks found in the Burera area. Construction of the hospital created jobs and skills in the region. The stonemasons who built the volcanic rock walls are now being sought in other parts of the country because of their work.

See more photos of the hospital below.

 

MASS Design Group

Images by Iwan Baan via MASS Design Group

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