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Literacy Campaign Messages Masquerade As Print Ads [Pics]

Agency DDB Paris uses a clever poster strategy to include illiteracy stats and campaign information in standard-looking campaigns.

Emma Hutchings
Emma Hutchings on April 24, 2013.

These posters use a clever strategy to shine a light on illiteracy in France. Created by ad agency DDB Paris for a literacy campaign in the country, they look like typical advertisements for a car, mascara, bikini, holiday, computer, and a movie, but the text includes illiteracy stats and campaign information.

The posters reward those who take a closer look, as the people who just glance at them or can’t read the text don’t discover the point behind them. They state that over 3 million people in France (and almost 10% of those aged 18-65) will keep on thinking they’re real ads because they can’t read.

Literacy Campaign Messages In Fake Ad Posters [Pics]

They ask those who read the ads to help make illiteracy the national cause of 2013 and direct them to sign a petition of the National Agency for the Fight Against Illiteracy in France.

The Huffington Post reports that the campaign has been awarded a ‘Yellow Pencil’ by the Designers and Art Directors Club (D&AD) in the UK. Click through to see the ads, which have been translated into English:

DDB Paris

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