Invisible Blinds Selectively Let In Light [Future Of Home Living]

Japanese researchers have developed a transparent sheet that lets in less sunlight in the summer and more in the winter.

As part of the Resourceful Design trend from our Future of Home Living report, which looks at how a new range of highly-efficient products and appliances for the home are lowering resource consumption, we’re highlighting an innovative window treatment called Invisible Blinds. The product is a transparent blind that is designed to let in less sunlight in the summer and more in the winter to help regulate heating and cooling needs and reduce the associated costs.

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Completely invisible to the human eye so they won’t impede your view or clash with existing decor, the blinds’ unique surface blocks light entering the window at a high incidence angle, which occurs during the summer, and allows light in at a low incidence angle, during the winter. Developed by Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology and Sumitomo Chemical Co Ltd, the blinds are a simple solution that work in the background, without the need for human control or interaction.

While the partner organizations don’t have plans to commercialize the product in the next several years, the blinds have potential implications for not only our homes and offices, but for motor vehicles as well.

Technologies like the Invisible Blinds fall under a larger theme we’re calling Equilibrium, which points to the way architects and designers are integrating feelings of balance, health, and well-being into people’s living spaces and everyday lives.

Invisible Blinds

PSFK has announced the latest in a series of trend reports. Following studies into retailsocial mediagamingwork and mobile, the PSFK Labs consulting team have generated the Future of Home Living report. That report manifests as a free summary presentation, an in-depth downloadable PDF and an exhibition in New York City that runs to August 16.

RSVP below to take a tour of the exhibition at 101W15th.

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