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Melting Inkjet Portraits Mutate Human Faces [Pics]

Melting Inkjet Portraits Mutate Human Faces [Pics]
culture

Portland-based artist Ben DeHaan removes UV light from the printing process and then lets the ink run down the image.

Emma Hutchings
  • 5 july 2013

Ben DeHaan is an artist based in Portland, Maine who uses a conventional inkjet printer to create a series of melting portraits. His project ‘Uncured’ features a number of unique ultraviolet cured inkjet prints.

Melting Inkjet Portraits Mutate Human Faces [Pics]

DeHaan removes the UV light from the printing process that usually quickly dries ink and places the print vertically to let the image slowly run down until the results are to his liking. He notes:

When uncured, the ink remains toxic and fluid. I am exploring the use of these printers without their essential element, UV light, in what I like to think of as a new process – UV uncurable inkjet printing perhaps? The images are printed uncured and flat, then positioned vertically allowing the ink to run. The images are not digitially manipulated but are rather representations of different moments during the process.

Click through to see a selection of the ‘Uncured’ portraits:

Ben DeHaan

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