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Airbnb For Hotels Lets Strangers Split Room Costs

Easynest connects individual travelers and allows them to save money on accommodation by sharing a room.

Alan Khanukaev
Alan Khanukaev on July 19, 2013.

Taking advantage of the uniform pricing most hotels charge for both single and double occupancy, Easynest enables solo travelers to split the cost of a hotel room by sharing it with a stranger.

Billing itself as “Airbnb for hotels and resorts,”, Easynest’s goal is to allow users to experience luxury at a fraction of the cost while building their network and meeting new people.

When traveling, users can either opt to be a host, meaning they list their hotel room as available to split, or they can search the site for currently available rooms.Though inventory is currently quite sparse, a cursory search on the site turns up available rooms everywhere from New York, Kansas and Minnesota to Israel, New Zealand, and Japan,

Easynest-website

The two-month-old San Francisco startup is still very much in its infancy. Unlike its more established peers in the sharing economy, Easynest currently lacks any type of secure payment options. The company recommends that guests “pay the host only when you arrive at the hotel once you have checked that everything is in order.” This of course doesn’t leave much recourse for guest or host should either party decide not to live up to their obligation.

Additionally, akin to similarly targeted services, like Couchsurfing or Sidecar, that involve connecting with strangers, there are some obvious safety concerns that arise when sharing a room with someone you don’t know. Generally companies involved in the sharing economy have policies and best practices in place as a means of mitigating this risk, an option not yet available at the fledgling company.

However, despite any initial concerns around the service, it can pose as a very useful option, particularly for major events (think SXSW, Comic Con, or Sundance) where hotel rooms quickly become booked.

Easynest

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