Mobile Farmer’s Market Travels To Produce-Deprived Neighborhoods

Design students implement their own ideas to improve a fresh produce delivery service.

Food deserts – areas where it’s difficult to access fresh fruits and vegetables – are a more common occurrence across the US than most people would think. That’s why one group of students from the Center for Design Practice (CDP) at Maryland Institute College of Art decided to try and design a more effective way to deliver fresh produce.

Normally the task of farms such as Real Food Farm to create their delivery vehicles, they handed the task out to the CDP instead, seeing what could come from a healthy does of design.

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As described by Mike Weikert – director of the CDP – when talking to FastCoExist:

The Center for Design Practice is a multidisciplinary studio focused on engaging students and partners in project-based learning, specifically, where results can make a positive impact on society. Real Food Farm was one of those projects.

Food trucks and street merchants are already popular in the city of Baltimore, which meant the students had a lot of information to draw on, especially when combined with a month working on the farm to get a better sense of what it takes to operate a mobile farmers market.

Some of the features that were added include a pullout drawer system that  lets staff organize produce on the road, a detachable awning, and a hook system that lets staff attach baskets to the side of the vehicle when it is stationary. There’s also an interchangeable panel system that features chalkboards, dry erase boards, and a map of the truck’s route – potentially even advertising.

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The project was a great success, proving that design can enhance how some businesses go about their daily work, especially in the case of something as important as delivery nutrition to those in need.

Real Food Farm

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