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160-Meter Long Poem Forms A Bridge Between Two Museums [Pics]

160-Meter Long Poem Forms A Bridge Between Two Museums [Pics]

Typographic path will make use of the first ever slab serif typeface.

Ross Brooks

As part of plans to turn a large area surrounding Kew Bridge Steam Museum in West London, Future City has commissioned a range of works from various artists, curators and cultural partners.

Designer Harry Pearce of Pentagram came up with the concept to create a physical link between the Steam Museum and the nearby Musical Museum, home to a collection of self-playing musical instruments.

The first stage of a 160 metre-long typographic installation is the text of a specially commissioned poem, “The Self-Playing Instrument of Water,” written by TS Eliot Prize-winning poet Alice Oswald. The path it will be set on is the site of old filtration beds that were once used by the Grand Junction Waterworks Company.

alice-oswald-poem-path-3

Oswald’s series of ten couplets will be set in what is believed to be the first ever slab serif typeface, Double Pica Antique – designed around the same time as the pumping station at Kew Bridge was built.

Click through to see more images of the giant poem.

Future City

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