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Specially-Designed 3D-Printer Creates Edible Dinnerware [Pics]

Specially-Designed 3D-Printer Creates Edible Dinnerware [Pics]

Home made printer uses sugar to create silicon moulds for these unique pieces of bone china.

Ross Brooks

Canadian designer Philippe Malouin has been commissioned for Staffordshire ceramics company 1882 Ltd to create a range of ceramics made entirely out of sugar. The “Dunes” Collection of plates and bowls were crafted using an analogue printer built by the designer himself.

The custom-made printer features a box frame and a wooden turntable that is powered by a small motor and controlled by a computer. Grains of sugar fall through a funnel like an hour glass, piling up on the spinning cylinder below to form structures like cylindrical sand dunes.

Dunes-Philippe-Malouin-1882-3

A silicone negative is created from the resulting shape, then cast in plaster and given to 1882 to produce in bone china. The final bone china pieces retain a sandy texture and have been finished with a matte glaze. More interested in the process of creating the crockery, Malouin was able to create shapes using the printer that would not be possible otherwise.

1882 Ltd

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