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Specially-Designed 3D-Printer Creates Edible Dinnerware [Pics]

Specially-Designed 3D-Printer Creates Edible Dinnerware [Pics]
Design

Home made printer uses sugar to create silicon moulds for these unique pieces of bone china.

by Ross Brooks
  • 19 september 2013

Canadian designer Philippe Malouin has been commissioned for Staffordshire ceramics company 1882 Ltd to create a range of ceramics made entirely out of sugar. The “Dunes” Collection of plates and bowls were crafted using an analogue printer built by the designer himself.

The custom-made printer features a box frame and a wooden turntable that is powered by a small motor and controlled by a computer. Grains of sugar fall through a funnel like an hour glass, piling up on the spinning cylinder below to form structures like cylindrical sand dunes.

Dunes-Philippe-Malouin-1882-3

A silicone negative is created from the resulting shape, then cast in plaster and given to 1882 to produce in bone china. The final bone china pieces retain a sandy texture and have been finished with a matte glaze. More interested in the process of creating the crockery, Malouin was able to create shapes using the printer that would not be possible otherwise.

1882 Ltd

Design
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