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Hearing Aid Eyeglasses Use Bone Conduction To Amplify Sound

Hearing Aid Eyeglasses Use Bone Conduction To Amplify Sound
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A new form of amplifying device that is more subtle than the current options.

Serena Chu
  • 17 september 2013

The conventional hearing aid is long overdue for a face lift – it’s time to say good-bye to in-canal electroacoustic devices. The Wireless Research Engineering Resource Center (RERC) led a team of Virginia Tech students to develop NuWave, a pair of glasses that transforms sound waves into vibrations.

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NuWave employs Bone Conduction transducers – the same technology used in Google Glass – to provide people with hearing disabilities a new way to experience sound.

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Transducers on the NuWave glasses are ergonomically positioned to carry mechanical vibrations against the temporal bone to the inner ear. This design provides the perfect alternative to hearing aids, because NuWave glasses are safer in design and easier to handle; NuWave glasses remove the excess bulk and the relatively high price tag of common day hearing aids.

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After extensive market research, RERC is confident that NuWave will offer a hearing solution that will help users get the most out of life. NuWave glasses offer exceptional wearing comfort and a better aesthetic appeal.

NuWave

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