How 3D Mapping Transforms Old Architecture Into New, Virtual Forms [Video]

Projection mapping provides artists and creators with a new way of transforming surfaces into visually stunning art pieces.

Projection mapping or 3D video mapping is transforming the world of visual art. With 3D video mapping, artists and creators can take a simple surface or facade and transform it into a 3D virtual world.

With the use of a special kind of software, artists can design and create animations that would be projected onto a side of a building or a ceiling. The architecture becomes the screen and the artist presents his or her own interpretation or art piece in the form of dancing lights and projections.

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Some of the artists known for creating stunning installations with 3D video mapping include German group Urbanscreen. The group is known for their massive installations like their project on the Sydney Opera House and the Spectacle for the 100th anniversary of the William Marsh Rice University in Houston, Texas. The group also used 3D video mapping to create interactive storytelling installations that combine live performers with virtual ones.

There’s also Belgian studio AntiVJ, which created installations like the ”0 (Omicron)” in the Centennial Hall of Wroclaw, Poland.

For a different kind of projection mapping, creative studio Bot & Dolly created a short film called Box, a live performance featuring the technology and large-scale robotics.

Watch some of the stunning installations created with 3D video mapping in the videos below.

The technology isn’t just exclusive to artists and designers. Marketing and PR professionals use it to promote brands and products. Social and political activists use it to create awareness and start discussions about important issues. The technology is a growing form of art and shows no signs of disappearing anytime soon.

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