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Color-Changing Concept Car Matches Driver’s Moods

Toyota wants you to treat your car more like an animal than an inanimate object.

Ross Brooks
Ross Brooks on November 6, 2013. @greenidealism

Toyota is currently developing a car that looks a lot like a Segway which is able to change color depending on the driver’s mood, as well as suggest the next destination based on a driver’s facial expression. It’s still a work in progress, but the car manufacturer plans to reveal the FV2 at this year’s Tokyo Motor Show on 23rd November.

The company wants people to rexamine their relationship with cars, treating them more like a living creature than an inanimate objects, as described on their website:

Toyota envisions an ever-developing driver-vehicle relationship similar to the relationship of trust and understanding that a rider might have with his or her horse.

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Apart from redefining what it means to own a car, the company wants to use the FV2 as a testing ground for many of their latest technologies which are based on humanoid robots and the use of voice and face recognition. As reported by Bloomberg, Takeo Moriai, a manager in Toyota’s product planning group said:

The car will appeal to future consumers of the digital generation, who have been used to smartphones or iPads from a young age. Given that the technology is still at a very early stage of development, it’s challenging for us to figure out the extent to which the car can read emotions.

The car, which intends to use artificial intelligence and computer-aided technology to enhance safety, efficiency and user experience will be on display alongside other ideas such as a four-seated hydrogen-powered car that is able to refuel in three minutes and can travel up to 500 kilometers.

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Check out the gallery of images below.

Toyota

Source: Wired

Images: Toyota

TOPICS: Automotive
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Ross is a freelance writer who specializes in topics about the environment, architecture, art, design and creative tech. He is passionate about making a difference with his writing, whether that’s to encourage social change, promote a great idea, or just share a little bit of beauty with the world. You can also find his work on Inhabitat and Techly.com.au.

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