PSFK Picks: Top Five Apps of the Week

Create your own unique music based on your driving pattern and monitor baby’s vitals from afar with wearable tech.

Each week PSFK features many new and innovative apps. To highlight the some of the best, we’ve compiled a roundup of the most interesting and creative apps written about on the site these past two weeks:

Wearable Tech For Babies Keeps Parents On Their Toes

Wearable Tech for Babies Keeps Parents on Their Toes

The creators of Sproutling hope to “make first time parents feel like second time parents” by monitoring their babies’ vitals and attempting to predict crucial moments, such as when baby will wake from a nap. The app will send gentle but honest suggestions to parents about what they could do to help their baby sleep, digest and grow better.

Bio-Sensing Necklace Will Let Wearer Test Their Own Blood And Fluids [Pics]

Bio-Sensing Necklace Will Let the Wearer Test Their Own Blood and Fluids [Pics]
In places where doctors are scarce but smartphone use is rapidly expanding, patients have a potentially valuable tool to help them manage their health. Funded with a commission from Wired Magazine and the Gates Foundation, Kernel, with its accompanying bio-sensing absorbent pad, can test blood, breath, urine and saliva, allowing the wearer to self-monitor and be monitored remotely. It can also send reminders of when to visit the doctor and take medicines.

Volkswagen App Converts Driving Patterns Into Enjoyable Music [Video]

Volkswagen App Converts Driving Patterns Into Enjoyable Music [Video]
Anyone has enjoyed the musical tones of a well-tuned engine or silently watched the landscape move to music will love Play the Road, which is a collaboration between Volkswagen and the British electronic music group Underworld. It creates ambient compositions based on the car’s movements.

Fast-Food EZ Pass System Ensures Minimal Human Interaction

Fast-Food EZ Pass System Ensures Minimal Human Interaction
This app, called iDriveThru, utilizes New York State’s toll payment system to pay for fast food meals at drive-thru windows and is currently operating at five Wendy’s in Staten Island. Though it’s picked a strange place for its pilot program considering New York’s general lack of car culture, iDriveThru is potentially very profitable for the cash-strapped MTA; if it charged Wendy’s 15 cents for each transaction, as it has in the past, it would make $150,000 a year just from those five establishments.

How Census Data Can Help Nomadic Urbanites Determine Where To Move Next

How Census Data Can Help Nomadic Urbanites Determine Where to Move Next
Moving to a new place? Don’t just rely on anecdotes, which can be biased or outdated. Dwellr, an app from the Census Bureau, provides information about various census zones using the American Community Service, which has data on over 40 topics. The Census Bureau has even released the API so developers can have more fun with the data.

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