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Designer Creates 3D Drawings In Water With Light

A special dye when illuminated can reveal floating geometric and organic forms.

Dave Pinter
Dave Pinter on December 10, 2013. @DavePinter

Champagne maker Perrier-Jouët collaborated with designer Simon Heijdens on a series of nine hand-blown glass vessels each of which contain evolving 3D drawings suspended in water. Heijdens debuted the series, Phare No. 1—9 at 2013 Design Miami. On initial viewing, each of the vessels are capped with a light fixture that illuminates water with what appear to be drops of dye. The installation rewarded visitors who were patient as they got to see a mix of three-dimensional organic and geometric forms take shape in mid-water. To keep an element of mystery, Heijdens hasn’t divulged exactly how the process works. We guess that it is a dye in the water that is activated by a very sharply focused UV light.

Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens

The cool thing about the work is that it each of the drawings fades away into the clear water over the span of a few minutes. So each of the vessels are self recycling. The geometric forms start out crisp an transition to a jelly like appearance. Heijdens took inspiration form the Art Nouveau style which favored natural forms and shapes derived from nature.

Check out this video which features Heijdens explaining the aesthetic and see the installation in motion.

Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens Phare 1-9 by Simon Heijdens

Source: Perrier-Jouet

TOPICS: Design & Architecture
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Dave Pinter is a senior editor at PSFK and focuses on automotive, design and retail news plus NYC culture. Dave is also a New York based concept designer.

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