Acme Product Diagrams To Help Coyote Catch Road Runner [Pics]

Daniel Weil designed spoof Acme products to headline Pentagram’s annual holiday card.

If it pleases the court, there is new supporting evidence in the case of one Wile E. Coyote versus the Acme Company.

For the annual Pentagram holiday card, Daniel Weil redesigned five Acme Company products – Burmese Tiger Trap, Rocket Sled, Spherical Bomb, Rocket Skates, and Spring-Powered Shoes – that Wile E. Coyote used to try and capture the Road Runner.

Drawing on Ian Frazier’s humor essay Coyote v. Acme from The New Yorker, Weil’s technical diagrams and blueprints present improved versions of the meal-catching devices that always let down the cartoon canine.

acme bomb

Frazier’s essay presents the plight of the Coyote in the form of an imaginary lawsuit in which he is seeking retribution from the Acme Company for continual product failure. This faulty merchandise, in the words of the defendant, led directly to “bodily injury” and is “due to defects in manufacture or improper cautionary labeling.”

The new gadget blueprints actually appear to counter the Coyote’s claims, indicating clear safety features like a “weighted armor jacket” for the Rocket Skates that would lead to the Coyote’s success in pursuit of the Road Runner. This likely oversight on the part of the Coyote is the most probable cause to the invariable product failure according to Weil, who added in a Wired Design interview that, “The Coyote, like most males, never reads the instructions.”

The drawings accompany a copy of Coyote v. Acme in Pentagram’s holiday card, which was designed with a legal blue dossier. Going above and beyond to ensure this new evidence is brought to light, Pentagram also set up a private reading of the notebook in New York this past December at which the presenters wore Acme emblazoned lab coats.

Check out the images below and decide for yourself if the Coyote was wronged, or just negligent.

Sources: Pentagram

Images: Warner Bros., Pentagram

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