PSFK’s Trending Topic: Best Anti-NSA Activism Hacks

Designers, developers and businesses are coming up with secure technologies that allow users to take control of their privacy rights.

In the wake of the NSA surveillance scandal, many offline and secure technologies have emerged to help people take control of their own privacy. These government- and hack-proof initiatives range from an open-source laptop that can be built at home to a cryptic typeface that is undecipherable to prying eyes.

Check out some of these technologies below.

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Open-Source DIY Laptop

Created by Sean “xobs” Cross and Bunnie HuangProject Novena aims to help people build their own homemade computers with open source hardware with specifications that are available to everyone. The creators are planning to launch a crowdfunding campaign for a “more friendly” version of the open-source laptop. The design and specifications of the laptop can be found on the project wiki.

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NSA-Proof Smartphone

The Blackphone is the first product of a joint venture between encrypted communications company Silent Circle and mobile solutions firm Geeksphone. The Android-powered Blackphone is said to be independent of carrier and vendor, and allows users to make and receive secure calls, send and receive SMS and files, and engage in video chats.

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Secure Alternative to Twitter

Twister, developed by Rio de Janeiro-based engineer Miguel Freitas, is a more secure alternative to Twitter. The “peer-to-peer” microblogging platform is a decentralized system that cannot be shut down by one entity. It works like a typical microblogging platform except that it doesn’t allow users to know who are online, what anybody’s IP address is, or who anyone is following or whose profile any user is reading.

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Cryptic Typeface That Cannot Be Read By Scanning Systems

Designed by Sang MunZXX is a typeface that cannot be deciphered by text scanning software. The typeface consists of four illegible font styles — Camo, Noise, False and Xed.

 

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