DreamWorks Develops Tablet To Push Content To Toddlers

Looking past movie theaters and television, DreamWorks has teamed up with Fuhu to create tech for kids.

Production studio Dreamworks  has teamed up with tablet maker Fuhu to create its own brand of touchscreen device for children as young as 2 or 3, called the DreamTab. Unlike other branded tablets, Dreamworks will be creating original content and programming for their piece of tech, as if it were a television channel.

Jim Mainard, Head of Digital Strategy and New Business Development for DreamWorks told the New York Times: “We could push out a new character moment every day of the year.”

The DreamTab will feature both original programming and the ability to stream from other television channels such as Disney and Nickelodeon, as well as play educational games and videos. Each tablet comes with a stylus, encouraging children to learn to draw with video tutorials from the studio’s animators.

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The collaboration between Dreamworks and Fuhu is a natural step forward for both companies. Children are now born with screens in front of their faces and are tapping and swiping before they are talking. Fuhu already makes a line of kids’ tablets, the Nabi, which sold more than 2 million units in 2013 according to the Times. Linking with a studio that creates popular children content, such as the Madagascar movies, to create a tablet that constantly updates with original programming is a way to entice parents to buy a brand new product, instead of relying on the iPad. The fact that it is also a fully functioning tablet for adults adds to the appeal.

Jim Mitchell, Fuhu’s chief executive said:

By teaming with DreamWorks to create a device that will have original content — original content that is automatically and frequently updated — we are not following consumers, we are getting ahead of them.

The DreamTab will debut at the International Consumer Electronics Show, which begins this week. It will reportedly retail for under $300.

Dreamworks // Fuhu

Source/Images: New York Times

 

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