menu

Anti-NSA Nametag Turns The Body Into A Picketing Tool [Video]

Anti-NSA Nametag Turns The Body Into A Picketing Tool [Video]
culture

Open-sourced project confronts government policy by putting users' private communicate on display.

Plus Aziz
  • 5 february 2014

Superflux’s Open Informant project features a wearable badge with an e-ink display, where an accompanying app searches the wearer’s communications (e.g. email, text messages) for NSA trigger words and displays those phrases onto the badge. The customizable nametag, which can be built on and tweaked by other designers on Github, is currently  uses the body as an instrument of protest, and could be utilized by campaign activists to display real-time protests.

Open Informant badge escalator

The project works to address the narrative of safety and security that dominates the surveillance of private conversations; thus when designers were tasked with creating products for the theme of absorption, they went on to test the first iteration of the theme publicly. The creators make a strong socio-political comment in how they describe the motivations behind the nametag:

By openly displaying what is currently taken by forceful stealth, we question the intrusive forms of mass surveillance adopted by democratic nations on its own citizenry, and in the process, shift the conversation around wearables from being about you and your body as machine, to the culture of machine intelligence and algorithmic monitoring

 Source: Superflux

+#culture
+#design
+#technology
+culture
+Culture
+Design
+Fashion
+hacking
+Innovation
+NSA
+technology
Trending

Volvo Is Launching A Global Car-Sharing Business

Automotive
Related Expert

Michelle Phan

cosmetics, e-commerce, online retail, beauty, lifestyle, fashion

Market Research january 20, 2017
PSFK MEMBERSHIP


JOIN RETAIL INTELLIGENCE PLATFORM
Get access to retail reports and 20,000 retail insights


LEARN MORE

TREND REPORT


FORECAST 2020
The Consumer Roles That Will Shape Our Future
 

DOWNLOAD NOW

IoT january 19, 2017
Technology january 19, 2017
No search results found.