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Solar-Powered Chargers Help Syrian Refugees Connect With Far-Away Family [Video]

WakaWaka’s Solar For Syria campaign is hoping to bring power and light to refugees in the foreign nation.

Leah Gonzalez
Leah Gonzalez on February 3, 2014. @leahgonz

WakaWaka, creator of low-cost solar-powered lamps and chargers, partnered with world renowned organization International Rescue Committee (IRC) and Dutch aid relief organization Stichting Vluchteling for the Solar For Syria campaign, which hopes to bring power and light to refugees in Syria.

The IRC distributed thousands of WakaWakas or the two-in-one solar lamp and charger device to Syrian refugee camps last year, but more are needed. The Solar For Syria campaign was launched last December to bring more WakaWakas to Syria. The campaign is similar to the “Buy One, Give One” campaign that WakaWaka launched for Haiti. People from anywhere in the world can purchase their own WakaWaka and for every item sold, one is donated to a Syrian family in a refugee camp. Supporters can also opt to simply donate to the campaign instead of buying a WakaWaka for themselves.

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WakaWaka’s solar-powered lamps and chargers provide relief to the refugees and also allow them to stay in touch with family and loved ones through what the UN has called the “worst refugee crisis of the century.” According to Bob Kitchen, IRC Director Emergency Preparedness and Response, “WakaWakas are among the most valued aid tools we distribute in Syria.”

WakaWaka, founded by Camille van Gestel and Maurits Groen in 2010, works to end energy poverty throughout the world by developing and manufacturing sustainable, highly efficient, lightweight, sturdy and compact solar-powered devices that come very useful in developing countries and even in developed markets.

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Check out the campaign video created by Developing Films below.

Solar For Syria

TOPICS: Environmental / Green
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Leah Gonzalez

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Leah is a freelance writer and blogger from Manila. She enjoys writing about technology, design, architecture, arts, and science.

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