What The Inventor Of The Internet Hopes It Will Become

Tim Berners-Lee’s shares his fears about privacy and his desire for an even more connected future.

The Internet recently turned 25, which has prompted Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with creating it, to speak out about his worries and aspirations for the future of the World Wide Web. At the top of his list of fears are issues surrounding privacy and censorship, as well as the underlying infrastructure, which he believes could be used to limit the amount of free communication.

Some of the ideas that Berners-Lee wants to implement include more democracy, greater access to healthcare information for the 60% of the world who can’t use the web to gain free access, and a better system to use the Internet for disaster relief around the world.

tim-berners-lee-magna-carta-bill-of-rights-2.jpg

As part of his aspirations, the creator has also propose a Magna Carta, which would be created as part of an initiative called “the web we want”. It’s a movement which asks people to help generate a digital bill of rights in their own country, which lays out a clear set of principles that can be adhered to by common Internet users, as well as public institutions, government officials and large corporations.

In an interview with The Guardian, Berners-Lee was quoted as saying:

 

Unless we have an open, neutral internet we can rely on without worrying about what’s happening at the back door, we can’t have open government, good democracy, good healthcare, connected communities and diversity of culture. It’s not naive to think we can have that, but it is naive to think we can just sit back and get it.


It’s a vision that many of us can probably relate to, and in light of the recent NSA scandal and other moves to limit online freedom around the world, it’s an idea that is definitely worth getting on board with.

Check out his TED talk with Edward Snowden below:



Source:
The Guardian

Images: Campus Party Brasil, Photoquantique via Flickr

Quantcast