Intricate 3D-Printed Dress Brings Couture To The Home [Video]

The Bristle Dress by architect and designer Francis Bitonti can be made entirely on a MakerBot Replicator 2 printer.

Brooklyn-based designer Francis Bitonti has designed a dress that can be customized for the wearer and 3D-printed anywhere with a Makerbot.

Bitonti created the Bristle Dress with the students at his studio’s New Skins Workshop Series. During the workshop students explore new computational design techniques and experiment with digital modeling and 3D printing technologies. The Bristle Dress is the second couture dress that came out of the workshop series. Last summer BItonti and the workshop participants designed the Verlan Dress.

The Bristle Dress consists of two pieces – an upper portion with a delicate coral-like design and made with translucent PLA filament, and a tessellated skirt made with MakerBot’s flexible filament and lined with faux rabbit fur.

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The files for the Bristle Dress can be downloaded from Thingiverse. The top of the dress takes approximately 160 hours to print while the bottom takes another 135 hours to produce.

According to the Francis Bitonti Studio,

We wanted to make the body solidify into harder geometry, going from atmosphere to ice. We integrated a fur lining in their version to ease in the transition. The skirt can be secured by either gluing a hook and eye strip or industrial zipper down the back seam. We are starting to think a lot about design interfaces and questioning how much the public is willing to design.

Bitonti is certainly no stranger to 3D-printed fashion. Last year he also worked with New York designer Michael Schmidt to create a nylon body-hugging 3D-printed dress for famous burlesque dancer Dita Von Teese.

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Accessories designer and model Ica Paru was the first to wear the Bristle Dress at a Brooklyn photo shoot. The video below shows a behind-the-scenes look at the photo shoot with Francis Bitonti talking more about the dress and his work with 3D-printing.

Francis Bitonti Studio
[h/t] Dezeen, Makerbot

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