Burt’s Bees Targets Consumers Through Their iCals

To promote a new line of anti-aging products, the brand created a campaign that adds events to people’s digital calendars.

Most brands and businesses these days use social media to promote their products and connect with their customers. Skincare brand Burt’s Bees is trying out something different to promote their new Brightening Line, a line of anti-aging products. The brand has created a campaign that adds promotional messages and reminders to people’s Yahoo, Google, Apple, or Microsoft digital calendars.

For the campaign, Burt’s Bees will be inviting customers to click on a link that will automatically add a series of 8 weekly calendar items. Like with typical calendar items, all information fields are filled out and if users set alerts for the appointments in their calendar, they will get reminder alerts for the Burt’s Bees messages, too.

The promotional messages include items like “Meeting to Discuss Your Beautimousness” with Burt’s Bees as the location. The following note is included in the item: “This meeting is to discuss your mind-blowing beautimousness. It should only take a few minutes, but we feel it is necessary to remind you just how beautimous you are. Imaginary lunch will be provided.”

The new Brightening Line products are not mentioned in any of the promotional messages until the fourth week, and on the eighth and final week, customers are encouraged to claim a free product sample and download a $3 coupon for one of the products, which can cost between $10 to $20 each.

According to a report on the NY Times, Burt’s Bees will start sending emails with the link to their mailing list next week. The campaign will also be promoted on the brand’s Facebook and Twitter networks.

The company believes this would be the first time that a brand will be taking advantage of people’s online calendars to promote their products.

The brand worked with Raleigh, North Carolina-based agency Baldwin& and New York agency RecCenter to create the campaign.

Burt’s Bees

[h/t] NY Times

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