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Learn new skills through the teacher’s eyes.

Back in the 19th century, Charles Caleb Colton coined the phrase ‘Imitation is the highest form of flattery,’ but he never touched on what is actually gained by the imitator. Presumably, the person being copied achieved something worth knowing. But with Ghost Glasses, you get to avoid misinterpretations and ensure that whatever it is you are trying to learn is being taught by a pro.

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Created by Winyu Chinthammit and a group of researchers at the University of Tasmania in Australia, Ghost Glasses are a pair of glasses worn by both a teacher and a student, allowing the student to learn a new skill. The glasses contain tiny cameras that track the teacher’s hand movements as they complete a task, then the feed is sent to the student.The student sees the teacher’s movements in a projected image, and can place his hands right on top of his teacher’s, making sure his technique is perfected.

So far, the research team has managed to teach six people to use chopsticks. The average time and general progress was comparable to that of a person learning to use chopsticks on their own, but the team believes the future will allow for increased opportunities, particularly for those in remote areas- who don’t have the proper resources to consult an expert.

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Ghost Glasses operates on an augmented reality system called Ghostman. Mark Bolas, an expert in virtual reality, video games and 3D technology, says it is an ‘exciting first step in quantifying the promise of augmented reality.’ To find out more, check out the video below.

(h/t NewScientist)

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