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A clever campaign keeps excess calories off your plate and donates them to the needy.

Every day, millions dig into enormous restaurant portions that aren’t entirely eaten or, even if they are, contribute to rising obesity rates. Fortunately, German food bank Düsseldorfer Tafel, working with Oglivy & Mather Germany, found a way to twist this problem to its advantage. Dusseldorf is one of the wealthiest cities in Germany, but its posh reputation makes it difficult for food banks to get donations to help the poor.

The “All You Can’t Eat” campaign has restaurants place stickers on menus next to the dishes that tend to be served in huge portions. Diners have the option to order smaller versions of the meals at the same price and the money that the restaurant saves will be donated to the food bank.

The campaign is simple and elegant, but even better, it doesn’t demand more costs. “Instead of just fishing for donations on their behalf we decided to provide them with an idea that would turn people into fishermen for them and provide a steady flow of donations — not just for a short time — but throughout the whole year,” Oglivy said on the promotional video’s YouTube page.

While in the U.S. the ‘grocery shrink ray’ has gained some negative attention for shrinking portion sizes in supermarkets, the elective nature of this project not only creates revenue but also raises awareness of both portions and poverty. The resulting cash injection has helped feed over 7,000 of Düsseldorf’s hungry. “When you can’t eat any more, there’s someone who can,” is the campaign’s tagline.

The initiative started on December 1st, and has since enjoyed sustained success. Oglivy has been encouraging other communities to try to replicate this idea.

Oglivy & Mather Germany

[h/t] Adland.tv, YouTube

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