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Brooklyn-based studio Fall On Your Sword created a functional musical instrument with the empty tubed packaging.

The mixed media artists over at music production and audio post company Fall On Your Sword (FYOS) in Brooklyn have created a functional music organ out of 250 empty cans of Pringles potato crisps.

The project was their response to a proposal that challenged anyone to share an image of what they would create if they had an unlimited supply of Pringles cans and chips.

In a post on Gawker, FYOS co-founder Will Bates, artist Sarah Bereza, and audio post mixer Ryan Price talked about how they came up with the project. According to them, they immediately thought of creating a musical organ because the Pringles cans resembled organ pipes.

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Bereza created the physical structure using an iPad and several boxes of Pringles potato crisps cans. Bates and Price created ten keys below the organ pipes by connecting cans to springs. Pressing on a key creates a tone and air generated by fans built within the organ is pushed out of the organ pipes. The tones were based on recorded organ tones and resonances that were played through the DIY organ itself. The artists also kept the bags of uneaten potato crisps so they could record the rustling sound and add it as percussion sound to the organ.

The project shows how this type of material can be upcycled in a creative way. The Pringles can-made musical organ will be displayed and played at Gawker’s annual Silent Disco in New York City.

Studio@Gawker and Pringles have an ongoing contest called Pringles as Art where people are invited to submit their own masterpieces made out of Pringles cans or crisps.

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Take a look at the clip below to see how the musical organ works.

Pringles as Art
[h/t] Gawker

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