What Happens On The Web In Just One Second [Pics]

A new study shows the huge leaps the Internet has made in producing and consuming content.

How has the Internet changed our world, and how do we wade through the sea of content that our fellow internet users have created? An unprecedented amount of content is coming together on our devices in a phenomenon known as media convergence, allowing our networked society to exert an increasing amount of influence on every creative field imaginable. Coinciding with the Internet’s 25th anniversary this month, Fractl put together a study that measures all things Internet, with a treasure trove of statistics to give us an idea of how far we’ve come.

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Considering that gigabytes were the largest unit of storage known to most people until a few years ago, it’s astounding to think that 7.79 terabytes are transferred across the internet each second. Fractl has calculated that if each byte were a single gallon of water, the amount of information transferred across the internet would fill the Pacific Ocean in just 122 days.

With the Internet’s tendency to distract people all day, it’s impressive to note that 18,144 novels worth of blog content are produced every day on WordPress. If you think none of that is being consumed, it’s heartening to note that 6,649,776 novels worth of blog content is read every day on the system.

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The presentation also has impressive statistics about the art, music, and other cultural productions that people are eagerly putting on the web for viewing. However, it also doesn’t shy away from the less savory aspects of Internet activity, noting that if one email was as long as a standard envelope, the amount of spam sent on the Internet could circle the globe every 2.2 minutes.

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The presentation also features live counters that give you a sense of how quickly information is evolving. We live in a truly unprecedented era of connection; here’s to this presentation becoming outdated in just a few months.

View The Content Explosion here.

Fractl

 

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