Resmo is a foldable floor mat designed to let travelers rest in between trips.

The airport has most things people need when they’re traveling, like shops, restrooms, and areas with free WiFi, but it doesn’t exactly offer comfortable places for regular travelers to lie down and rest or catch a few winks when they flights are delayed or canceled. Other than curling up on the floor or on a row of seats at the waiting area, passengers have limited options unless they carry a membership for premier services or are willing to pay extra costs.

Designer Chien-Hui Ko has a created a solution for that in the form of a floor mat called RESMO, which can be folded and unfolded in several ways to let the user sit back or lie down comfortably in any surface.

The folding floor mat can be used as a flat bed or a seat. The mat has a built-in support for the backrest which can be pulled out using a strap. What really stands out from the design of the portable furniture is that it features a built-in shield meant to provide some semblance of privacy for the user and to help block out noise. The mat is made of felt to help reduce background noise. The folding mat is light and folds completely flat for easy storage and transport.

Users can find set up the mat in a suitable surface and enjoy their new semi-private space. People traveling in groups can set up their individual mats together and feel comfortable in their own zone.

Chien-Hui Ko developed RESMO as part of her diploma project at the Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weisensee. The design has won a Red Dot Award for Design Concept 2014.

Airports are not exactly known for peace and quiet and it can get stressful for passengers when unexpected delays or cancellations happen, so the floor mat can potentially help relieve some of that stress.

The RESMO project was designed to be an emergency bedding that airports can give out to passengers in case of flight delays or cancellations, but the concept also has potential applications in other areas like emergency evacuations or even for lounge areas or office “nap rooms.”

[h/t] Yanko Design

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