Mother’s Day Campaign Envisions A Future With Robot Moms

A new ad for War Child Canada aims to show that you can’t donate motherhood online, but you can simply donate money to help.

Children suffer the most during war. The destruction and violence of conflict rob them of their childhood and leave them vulnerable. That is why charity organizations like War Child Canada work hard to make sure children in war-affected areas are taken care of and receive access to basic health care, education, opportunities to learn skills and get jobs, as well as legal services.

Launched in time for Mother’s Day when everyone has motherhood on their minds, War Child Canda’s latest initiative is a satirical campaign that leads people into believing that they can perform “motherly” duties to children in war-affected areas via a new robot technology.

Surrogaid, created by creative collaborative john st., is a website that lets visitors select from a menu of products that would be delivered by a robot to children in a war-torn country. The website looks very “official” and describes Surrogaid as a “revolutionary new way to remotely donate motherhood online.” The products include simple things like “Prepare a casserole,” “Lull a child to sleep,” and “Hug a child.” With just a few clicks, visitors can “send” these services to a child in a war-torn area by connecting with a Surrogaid stationed around the globe.

Surrogaid-War-Child-Canada-2.jpg

Of course, these services are not real, and at the end of the “purchase” process, the visitors of the Surrogaid website are informed that, “You can’t donate motherhood. But you can donate money.”
In a press release, Stephen Jurisic, ECD of john st., said,

We wanted to make it seem plausible that you could donate the act of motherhood online. But of course you can’t. Only real mothers in these war-affected countries can provide their children with that.

James Topham of War Child Canada commented that,

We thought this was a fresh way to remind people just how important mothers are to the healthy development of children – particularly in the context of war. And that the best way to support them is still the easiest – by donating money.

The campaign is being rolled out on TV and radio, and through out-of-home and online advertising channels.

John St. worked with Jono Hunter of OPC and Jam3, which developed the interactive web experience, to create the campaign.

Check out the video below for more about the campaign.

Surrogaid // War Child Canada
Source: AgencySpy

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