Pulley System Keeps Bikes Out Of View And Off This Home’s White Walls

Tribe Studio’s renovation shows how to maximize space in an urban home.

For a home in Sydney, Australia, a family wanted pristine white walls to show their artwork, but they also used their bikes daily and wanted easy access to them. In this budget conscious renovation, architecture firm Tribe Studio decided to turn House Bruce Alexander‘s atrium space into a secret bike holder by hanging them from hooks and winching them up into the atrium. That way, they wouldn’t eat up space on the walls that could be used for artwork.

Designed for artist Giles Alexander, environmental scientist Anna Bruce and their family, the bike system helps free up much needed room in their small urban home. From a small window in the bathroom, guests can see whether the two owners’ bikes are at home, as it opens onto the atrium, catching some light but also viewing the end of the bikes when in storage.

Bicycle pulley system in action

While not everyone has an atrium in which to store extra bikes in their home, many spaces do have high ceilings. Some sort of ceiling hack for bike storage could work really well for a lot of homes, and prevent the wear-and-tear that’s endemic to every wall where bikes simply get leaned upon.

It would be a simple matter for developers in urban areas to rig apartments with some sort of simple ceiling bike storage system. As more and more young people show an inclination to move to cities and live without cars, building out of the way bike storage solutions into new residential units could become de rigeur, and ceilings could be the right spot to put those solutions in many urban spaces.

Bike culture will have really arrived, though, when developers start building sidewalk level bike garages into new row homes.

Tribe Studio

[h/t] dezeen

 

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