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To promote its new can size, the softdrinks brand sold them from tiny vending machines.

Beverage brand Coca-Cola worked with ad agency Ogilvy & Mather in Berlin for its latest campaign to promote the brand’s new mini can size.

Coca-Cola, with the help of Ogilvy & Mather, installed a series of mini kiosks that sell tiny 7.5 ounce Coke in cans from small vending machines. The mini Coca-Cola kiosks were rolled out in five major cities in Germany.

The mini kiosks not only sold the small cans of Coke, but also sold familiar items like newspapers, candy bars, and other snacks – items that are usually sold in similar beverage and newsstand kiosks. The miniature Coke kiosks, which looked like they were half-buried in the ground, also had a real vendor inside them.

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The cute mini kiosks were such a hit that they apparently sold an average of 380 mini Coke in cans – 278% more than the typical Coca-Cola vending machine. Passersby and customers also had a great time buying from the popup store and having their photos taken with the kiosk and the vendor.

The kiosks also included a small table and small chairs set up in a space next to the kiosk so people can sit back and enjoy their tiny Coke.

The Coca-Cola campaign came with the tagline “It’s the little things in life that make us happy,” and they certainly made more than a few people smile with their charming little popup kiosks.

Coca-Cola is no stranger to campaigns that involve popup installations or stores. Last year, the company launched the “Roll Out Happiness” truck, a truck that rolled out real grass in the shape of a Coke bottle in the middle of an urban space to create an area where people could kick off their shoes and relax with a Coke in their hand. The year before that, the company teamed up with Italian TV chef Simone Rugiati and installed a popup dining table pulled out of a converted Coke truck in Italy. The popup dining room was meant to promote the “Let’s Eat Together” movement.

Check out a video about the campaign below.

Source: PopUp City, designboom

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