Keloptic’s new series of ads brings focus to the difference the right pair of lenses can make.

Any fan or lover of art may be able to appreciate a series of ads that shows a different perspective of some well-known works of art by world-famous artists.

Advertising agency Y&R; Paris created a series of ads for France-based eyewear retailer Keloptic and the ads feature classic impressionist paintings and present how a pair of glasses can put the blurred imagery into focus.

Impressionism is an art movement that started in the 19th century and the paintings from this art movement are characterized by short and thick brush strokes, vibrant colors, an emphasis on light and its changing qualities, and the painting is meant to capture the overall essence of the subject and does not focus on details and lines – giving an appearance of being blurry or hazy.

The series of ads feature famous impressionist paintings by artists like Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet, and Georges Seurat, and overlaid on each of the paintings is a large pair of eyeglasses with clear lenses. The blurry images – the identifying characteristic of paintings from the art movement – appear clear and distinct when viewed through the lens of the eyeglasses.

The difference is quite striking and perfectly delivers the message of the tagline of the series of ads. The tagline, which says, “Turning impressionism into hyperrealism,” shows how something as simple as a piece of eyewear can radically change one’s vision.

Keloptic was founded by Charles Dupontreué, a professional optician, and Quentin Pauvert, a web specialist. They created KelOptic to bring quality optical products to consumers at a reasonable price. The aim of the Impressionism ad campaign is to convince people that they can “see better and pay less” with Keloptic’s eyewear products.

The campaign was launched last April and has attracted a lot of attention. The advertising campaign even received a merit award in the Magazine/Full Page or Spread – Campaign Category at this year’s One Show.

Y&R; Paris // Keloptic

[h/t] AdWeek

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