3D-Painting Street Murals in Iran Create Optical Illusions

Government approves streetscapes being turned into giant art galleries

Governments that approve of street art are normal but there are exceptions to the rule, which makes Iran a welcome addition to the list. Designer and street artist Mehdi Ghadyanloo has wasted no time in plastering his 3D artworks all over the capital of Tehran. Trained as an animator, the artist has turned boring slabs of concrete into exciting pieces of multi-dimensional art. Keep going to see how much of a difference public art can have when it’s done right.

Some of the scenes on show include a blocky futuristic world with flying taxis, a balloon-powered construction worker floating away, and an amphitheater that bores its way into the side of a building. Apart from the pictures shown above and below, there are also plenty more on the artist’s website.

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To make his work across the city even easier, Mehdi decided the best course of action was to establish a mural-painting company called Blue Sky Painters. With the full support of the city’s municipality, the artist wants to make sure he can put as many large-scale street art projects into place as possible.

The city is an architectural mishmash with buildings often having only one facade and the other three just left blank and grey. This doesn’t make for a beautiful city but it is a great environment for mural work. I think the municipality really felt the need to bring some cohesion or at least colour to the often confused and smog-smeared architectural face of the city.

Many of Mehdi’s pieces tell a story, or interact with the environment around them, which helps them to become a part of the everyday fabric in Tehran, as opposed to just an awkward extension.

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Mehdi Ghadyanloo

[h/t] Beautiful Decay

Images by Mehdi Ghadyanloo

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