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Swedish company hooks up bidders to take emotional response to art as currency.

Swedish glass maker Kosta Boda hosted an auction that gave away three unique pieces of glass art based solely on emotions rather than the highest monetary bids.

The bidding, which was dubbed “An Auction Based on Emotions,” took place last June 18th in Stockholm and people were able to place blind bids on the art works in advance. The three glass art pieces, however, were kept secret until the day of the auction. The auction participants were taken to a closed off area and hooked up to a heart rate monitor and a galvanic skin response (GSR) sensor before the glass artworks were shown to them for the first time. The participants’ emotional response to the art pieces were then measured by the sensors. The three bidders who had the highest emotional responses to each of the three glass art pieces “won” the bidding and took home the art works.

Kosta Boda auctioned off three works of art which were worth a total of € 25,000 or about $34,000. The three glass art pieces that were given away were Protocol by Bertil Vallien, worth €15,000; Super Protection 2 by Åsa Jungnelius, worth €1,900; and Guitar by Kjell Engman, worth €8,500.

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A total of 303 people participated in the unique auction. The winners were Liv Eklund Swartz who won Protocol by Bertil Vallien, David Dolfe who won Åsa Jungnelius’s piece Super Protection, and Shelley Mulshine, who won Kjell Engman’s Guitar.

Jenny Sundqvist, Director of Marketing and Product Development at Orrefors Kosta Boda, commented, “It’s a great feeling to know that our unique pieces are now owned by people who definitely were not left untouched by the art glass, they felt very strongly about it.”

Kosta Boda worked with ad agency Ellermore to develop the concept and digital agency Humblebee provided the technology.

The auction was billed as the first of its kind and Kosta Boda launched this emotions-based auction to show his belief that art should be owned by people who feel the strongest about it, rather than who can pay the most for it.

Kosta Boda

 

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