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Designer Omer Polak’s ‘Blow dough’ project manufactures dough balloons using an industrial blower

Israeli designer Omer Polak is a graduate of the Department of Industrial Design at Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem. Polak inflated food as part of his “Blow dough” art installation, which illustrates the food manufacturing process in a small-scale factory that was established for one day as an analogy to street food carts and the urban eating experience in Jerusalem.

The inflated food designs were created with flour and water, inspired by popular Jerusalem food scene ingredients found in pita bread, bagels, bans, and more. The aim was to exhibit to viewers an open and transparent scene of the production process as well as a fresh perspective on dough.

“Blow dough” manufactured dough balloons using an industrial heat blower, with temperatures reaching as high as 600-degrees Celsius. This made the seasoned dough bake while blowing it into the shape of an inflated balloon. In the manufacturing process, local herbs were added to the blowing and assimilated into the dough, which helped to enrich the entire eating experience for those involved.

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This project was created for the Jerusalem Design Week, and it reflects many aspects of Jerusalem. The multicultural city hosts many types of foods, dishes and eating habits influenced by different cultures. The local food in Jerusalem is usually referred to as “street food” and characterized by a similar food-making process, which surrounds one small counter where all the magic happens.

One of the most popular and common ingredients in the Jerusalemite food arena (and the entire middle east) is the various different types of bread. This is why the very basic ingredients of flour and water were chosen for this project and combined with the designer’s creative processes.

The “Blow dough” food design project offers a new perspective on dough uses by borrowing the producing process from other industries. It also enables the participants to view and be exposed to the food process both openly and transparently. You can check out the design process and see lots of people creating dough balloons of various shapes and sizes in the video below:

Omer Polak

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