Bow and Arrow Business Cards Are Breakroom-Battle Ready

Laser-cut cards are memorable and unique, and contain tiny weapons, too.

Workday warriors can now ignite inter-office warfare simply through self-promotion. These laser-cut wooden cards, containing all the usual info, allow networking employees to press very small arms into the palms of their would-be enemies and allies alike.

Kicking things up a notch amid a recent wave of unorthodox business cards, Australian design firm Filter has partnered with graphics firm Potato Press to outfit Longbow Productions staff with business cards that reflect the company’s creative image and reference its name with a nifty (and only slightly dangerous) toy. Each slim mahogany card breaks into three pieces, allowing the recipient to pocket the portion containing contact information while using the remaining pieces to construct a functioning bow and arrow with the help of a rubber band.

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Longbow and Filter are only two of many companies recognizing and taking advantage of the desire for stand-out stationery. 2014 has seen a particular rise in this trend with companies reaching beyond the oddly shaped and colored, printed cards of yesteryear for out-of-the-box items with entirely new forms and functions. Many workers are handing out useful cards that support their companies’ mission statements, such as TechKeys’ working mini-keyboard and Valley Farms’ peat moss seed packet.

Other companies offer items which compliment their service, as with a mountain hostel whose card contains a remedy for altitude sickness and even AXE, of body spray fame, whose marketers just might stir up a little pleasure with their business using cards infused with their individual pheromones. Some companies, like Longbow, seem to want to mix work and play, however; high-level LEGO employees have been handing out miniature versions of themselves, while users of Kevin Bates’ Arduboy card will be handing out over nine hours of Tetris game play with their contact details.

The unifying message of these varying cards is clear, however: to each their own.

[h/t] Gizmodo

Images: Filter

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