Fashion Designer Solders Rather than Sews Garments for Scarred Seams

The Provo-CUT collection’s ‘scar-lines’ highlights the long-term effects of mankind on the planet

When one thinks of soldering, electronics, plumbing, and sheet metal likely comes to mind, but the process is pretty effective in joining non-metals as well, like the plastic-based fabric, neoprene. Because the fabric has left the realm of wetsuits and is being employed more in the fashion world, one designer decided to create a collection around it, To give the line more of a voice, she also decided to solder the seams instead of sewing them- the result is powerful.

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Zita Merenyi’s new line is called The Provo-CUT collection. It features oversized coats on top of satin dresses. This sounds fairly simple, until you learn that the elaborate designs were joined together without needle or thread. Merenyi used heat to bond the grey fabric of the coats and lacerated the dresses beneath them with a soldering iron. Afterwards, she painted the edges and openings of the linear protrusions bright colors. Besides looking great, Merenyi created the collection to be part of a bigger conversation. Because the soldered lines resemble scars, Merenyi says she wants them to reflect the long-term effects of mankind on Earth, similar to the way tattoos affect the body.

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Though the designer is, in essence, greatly harming the fabric, she is able to fix it and help it remain beautiful by “healing” the holes. Each of the incisions is hand-made by Merenyi, like every piece of pollution hurts the planet. When Merenyi treats the holes with paint, she is helping to lessen the negative effect, in the same way that people should work to reduce any negative effects we bring upon the Earth. When it’s possible, we should try to never harm the Earth, but sometimes scarring the planet is unavoidable. Regardless of that, when the Earth is sick as it is right now, people can look to this collection as a reminder that it is capable of improving. Even the littlest thing we can do could be a huge benefit to the planet; all we have to do is act.

[h/t] Dezeen

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