GE Redesigns Footwear Created for Walking on the Moon

Designed with special materials and attention to detail, the Missions sneaker was designed to symbolize innovation, human achievement and help GE fortify its place in the sun

The boots worn by Neil Armstrong when he walked on the moon back in 1969, leaving man’s first footprint is a monumental symbolization for the human race as well as the brands that were affiliated with making it happen (if you want to think of it that way).

The astronaut boots that were worn were made from GE silicon rubber, designed for extreme weather and conditions. The company’s scientists also developed industrial-strength plastic found in the visors of the space helmets.

Paying homage to the 45th anniversary of mans first moonwalk, 100 limited-edition Mission sneakers just went on sale. Reinvented by GE and made from from “super materials” typically used in jet engines and wind turbines, the footwear was created not only to celebrate a great moment in history but also to relate the power of advanced materials and technologies, according to GE’s global director of innovation, Sam Olstein.

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Stabilized carbon fiber was placed on the side of the shoe because it is lighter than steel and aluminum alloy yet can withstand the challenging conditions of a jet engine’s belly. Thermoplastic rubber, on the top collar of the sneaker, is more resistant and flexible than the standard variety. To prevent water damage, the shoe is covered in a hydrophobic coating that is more commonly used to prevent ice from adhering to machines. Finally, 3M (MMM) Scotchlite reflective material around the laces’ eye rows increase visibility.

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The Missions were designed with Android Homme, a luxury footwear company in Los Angeles, and are available for purchase via retail site Jack Threads at a price tag of $196.90.

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via Businessweek

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