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An unconventional use of the photo sharing app makes for a novel promotional campaign.

The love of young, urban 20-somethings everywhere, IKEA has made a name for itself as a trustworthy and affordable source of stylish home decor. While their mainstay offerings – like the record-holding Expedit shelves or the simple Malm dressers – provide a standard way to furnish an empty apartment, IKEA’s yearly PS collections push the boundaries and rival the likes of Design Within Reach and CB2. The PS 2014 collection is the company’s 8th line within the series, and offers “flexible solutions for young-in-mind urban people living ‘in the moment,'” according to the brand’s site.

To promote this year’s collection, IKEA’s Russian division teamed up with Moscow-based agency Instinct to produce a campaign that approaches Instagram in an entirely new way. With the collection’s mission statement of “Always on the move,” IKEA hacked the social platform to create a website out of the Instagram grid.

The Ikea_ps_2014 Instagram account serves as the website’s “home page,” with each post representing a product category like Benches or Tables. When you tap the individual category picture, hidden tags are revealed that offer a “link” to each product within that category. Every one of the 34 items in the collection received their own Instagram accounts – like ps_laptop_station and ps_side_table. Within each product’s Instagram account lies videos of the item being used, product information, and snapshots for different angles. Extending the “site” idea even more, each photo in the unique product account is tagged with the other item accounts within that category – so from ps_side_table you can easily tap and go to ps_storage_table, just like referring links on a regular website.

This unconventional use of the social photo sharing platform has its roots in previous brand campaigns. Earlier this year, Mazda and JWT Canada turned the car-maker’s Instagram feed into an interactive road trip, replacing boring car specs with images and videos that followed one of the vehicles on an epic adventure. In a similar vein, the Toronto Silent Film Festival turned the feed on its side, creating an interactive timeline complete with factoids and video clips to celebrate Charlie Chaplin’s 100 years on film.

[h/t] Creative Review

Image: Core77

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