Daniel Spoerri has turned lunchtime into artwork by capturing the table setting of some of his favorite meals.

It may not seem like it, but meal time is often more than the hour we recharge with food. Whether its sitting down with coworkers for a well deserved break, Sunday dinner with your grandparents or just a late night snack with your roommates, meals are times to reconnect, relax and remember the good times before returning to the activities of the day. Often these meal times are overlooked.

Swiss artist Daniel Spoerri understands this better than most other people. In order to highlight the importance of these daily gatherings, Spoerri turned meals he and his friends had into a piece of art back in the 1960s as part of a series of 3D wall mounts he labeled as “snare pictures.”

The modern artist described “snare picture” as “objects, which are found in randomly orderly or disorderly situations, are mounted on whatever they are found on (table, box, drawer, etc.) in the exact constellation they are found in.” In these particular 3D wall mounts, Spoerri affixed every part of the table top — everything from utensils, serving dishes, even scraps of food — before removing the legs of the table and setting it up to be exhibited on a wall. This way, he is able to perfectly capture not only a moment of calm after the feeding frenzy but also the chaos of the meal before it.

It is a project that holds a dual meaning in the era of camera phones and instant messaging, when sacrificing face-to-face conversation over a good meal to instead invest in cellphone happenings is a common trend. The times immortalized in these carefully preserved tables serve as a reminder that sitting down for a meal should mean more than just shoveling food in between texts.

Spoerri isn’t the only artist to make art out of a meal. Kentucky-based artist Meg C created gold-plated Kentucky Fried Chicken bone necklaces, bringing food to the forefront once more–though with a bit more personal, portable touch.

Daniel Spoerri

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