Artist Launches Line Of Deconstructed Jewelry Heirlooms

The Héritage collection reinterprets classic pieces that can be passed down for generations

Family heirlooms are special not just because they have been in the family for years, but also because they are beautiful. When people think of jewelry heirlooms, things like engagement rings, brooches, and pendants come to mind, and for each of those pieces, the style is a very important component. For the modernists, it can be difficult to appreciate an heirloom if the style is something that seems too antique, but a new jewelry collection does a great job of combining traditional and fresh to form a stunning line.

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Héritage is the newest collection from jewelry designers Maison Martin Margiela. The line features classic pieces like a gold signet ring, a sapphire pendant necklace, and an engagement ring, but each item has been literally deconstructed to give it a more up-to-date flair. The signet ring, for example, has been cleaved down the middle, the sapphire pendant has been removed from its diamond frame, and the band of the engagement ring, deemed the ‘non-engagement ring,’ which features two half-moon shaped diamonds at opposite ends of a band that doesn’t close. A representative from Maison Martin Margiela tells The New York Times Magazine, ‘It is called a non-engagement ring due to the fact that Maison Martin Margiela never ascribes a particular role or use for our creations. This ring can and should be worn by the engaged and the non-engaged alike.’ The representative continued by saying the ring could be worn by both men and women as a sign of love or just of friendship.

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Though Maison Martin Margiela has not produced fine jewelry in over three years, these kinds of multipurpose uses are what make the Héritage collection standards for tomorrow’s heirloom jewelry pieces. They embody all the charm and class of traditional pieces of jewelry but are presented in a completely new way.

Maison Martin Margiela

[h/t} The New York Times Magazine

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