Japan Airlines Flight Serves Colorful Delicacies for In-Flight Meal

Grilled cutlassfish, steamed eel, and tuna sashimi put other airlines to shame

Airline meals are known to fall woefully short on basic requirement such as taste, nutrition, and presentation – unless you’re on a long-haul flight provided by Japan Airlines. One of the contributing editors over at Jaunted was lucky enough to experience an appetizer with nine different Japanese delicacies, followed by grilled cutlassfish with asparagus and potato salad and braised chicken with yuzu chili-flavored radish sauce. Keep going for even more mouth-watering dishes.

The appetizer on offer consists of nine small bowls filled with different dishes from around the island nation. Presented in a wooden box, each bowl contained an intricate assortment of ingredients. Row one featured tomato and tofu salad, green soy tofu with seaweed sauce, and fried pike conger with soy vinegar jelly. Row two had grilled halibut with sea urchin and grilled chicken liver, tuna sashimi with yam and prawn, and scallop topped with grated radish. Finally, row three was home to miso-flavored minced pork in a ginger sauce, steamed eel with fish cake and braised duck breast, and “ayu” sweetfish sushi wrapped in bamboo leaf.

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As already mentioned, the main was Grilled cutlassfish with asparagus and potato salad and braised chicken with yuzu chili-flavored radish sauce. Whether or not it’s even possible to finish all of that food is an important question to ask. Being given an inadequate meal is no fun, but wasting a variety of rare ingredients might not be much better.

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The luxury food offerings are part of JAL BEDD, which stands for Japan Airline’s Bed, Eating, Delicious and Dream. It’s a subtle reminder that once you’ve enjoyed some fine dining, your seat will then transform into a mattressed bed so you can enjoy all sorts of airborne dreams. From looking at Japan Airline’s website, it would seem that the luxury meals are only available for business and first-class passengers – so don’t get your hopes too high if economy is your mode of travel.

Japan Airlines

[h/t] Jaunted

Images by Rayme Gorniak/Jaunted

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