Hit-Girl and other female characters designed to challenge gender stereotypes

Jon Lazar is a New York developer and social media consultant who decided to create his own line of feminine LEGO Minifigures called “The LEGO Super Friends Project.“ Even though some people criticized his work for being too “doll-like” and conforming to gender stereotypes, he has at least managed to bolster the amount of female characters available for LEGO fans. Keep going to see kick-ass heroines such as Supergirl, Spider-Woman, and Hit-Girl.

The project started with a simple question on social media: “Who is your favorite super heroine?” Taking note of the responses, Jon made a list on his white board, and then set to work creating the minifigs. He also set out some guidelines for himself, that included: Each character must fit into the role of super heroine (as some people did request villains), no character would be repeated in alternate costumes, and one character release per day for the entire month of July. For a full list of characters, head over to Jon’s blog post about the project.

Despite the criticism he received in 2012, Jon is convinced he made a difference:

For me, the project was a success. I was not only able to challenge the stereotypes put forth by the Friends line, but I was also able to open dialogs about those pink clichés and just reach out to fans of those heroes. I was also able to engage with some of the comic book creators and show them what can be done with their characters and LEGO Friends.

In the future, Jon plans to move from a creating a new character daily, over to a weekly schedule. Also, his focus will no longer be on just super heroines, but also villains, video game characters, and any other human characters that can take on minifig form. What will remain the same is that his focus is still on “challenging the stereotypes put forth by the Friends toys.”

Jon Lazar

[h/t] Laughing Squid

Images by Jon Lazar

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