Powdered Milk Gets Honored with High-Speed Evocative Dance

Ordinary consumer good gets an artful update in a ballet-inspired campaign

Powdered milk creamer, which mixes in coffee, tea, or hot cocoa on-the-go, is convenient. It’s uncomplicated. Some even say it’s tasty. But absolutely no one would call it beautiful. Unless you are Campina Friesland Kievit.

In order to promote its creamers, the Dutch food company collaborated with agency Norvell Jefferson and photographer Jeffrey Vanhoutte to create an advertising campaign that pairs the product with lyrical dance.

Under the guidance of Creative Director Jurriaan Eversdijk, Norvell Jefferson developed and produced the print and video campaign, which presents female dancer Noi Pakon in a white full-body leotard dancing barefoot on a concrete floor, interacting with large clouds representing powdered milk. At times, she throws the product, and in other scenes, it is blown at her from off-camera.

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creamer ad campaign dance cloud.jpgAs Vanhouette explains, Campina Friesland Keivit wanted the campaign to approach consumer packaged goods from an unexpected perspective. He tells Bored Panda:

The client requested to have a new – teasing / disruptive – approach in a conventional market. This was the ultimate idea to capture the attention on a matter that is otherwise pretty ordinary within their buyers’ market [...] Norvell Jefferson’s idea was to capture the beauty (metaphore) of a dancer (using elegance and beauty) together with the explosion of the new creamers range

This campaign is not only notable for its artful interaction with ordinary products, but also for its use of a high-speed camera. The crew shot the campaign with a Phantom Miro high-speed camera, filmed at 1,500 frames per second, and photographed using a Credo 60 back at 1/6.000 second speed.

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For lighting purposes, the production team did not use creamer on the set. Instead, Pakon interacts with a blend of stone, sand, milk, holi powder, chalk, and other ingredients. To protect the equipment from product dust, all cameras were wrapped in plastic bags.

Norvell Jefferson

 

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