halfsies-food-waste-charity-1.jpg

Lose weight and do some good in the world by donating your leftovers

Controlling the size of your portions is a great way to save money, food, and unnecessary health problems caused by obesity. Eating out on the other hand, takes that control away from you – unless you go for a restaurant that’s signed up for Halfsies. Launched at the end of 2012 in Texas and New York, it’s an initiative that lets you donate half of your food before it even gets to the table. Apart from the warm fuzzy feeling you get from giving, your waistline will be thankful as well.

Here’s how the idea works: Diners will still pay full price for a meal but receive half of the portion size instead – while the other half goes off to people in the city who do not have enough money to buy their own food. Unless you use a doggie bag every time (and finish the leftovers within a few days), it’s pretty clear that the other half of your meal is going to be put to better use.

The proceeds from Halfsies are split between local (60 percent) and international non-profits (30 percent) that tackle hunger, with 10 percent of the donations going towards the operating costs of the company.

“It’s a win-win-win. Plus, it is an ongoing choice, not just something available one day or a week out of the year. It is sustainable,” Sydney Berry Ling, Co-Founder and Communications Director tells FoodAndTechConnect.com.

While the benefits of the scheme are obvious, keep in mind that eating half as much food when you’re in a restaurant will also mean less calories. Over the course of a few months there’s a strong chance you will feel fitter, look better, and steer clear of health problems that could strike later in life like heart disease.

halfsies-food-waste-charity-2.jpg

If you live in New York or Austin, make it your mission to track down a restaurant that’s signed up to Halfsies and eat there once in a while. if you can’t find any, then get in touch with the organization to find out more, or maybe even encourage them to expand the scheme in your local area.

Halfsies

[h/t] Inhabitat, HuffPost

Images by Halfsies

Comments

Quantcast