In Brief

Dj-Spooky-Torjan Next month sees the release of a collaboration between Trojan Records and DJ Spooky called DJ Spooky Presents: 50,000 Volts of Trojan Records . We wanted to ask DJ Spooky, aka Paul Miller, a few questions not only about his project and the resurgence in reggae; but also about mash-up culture, copyright law and creativity. In return, he gave us a sneaky remix track of his new record.

Next month sees the release of a collaboration between Trojan Records and DJ Spooky called DJ Spooky Presents: 50,000 Volts of Trojan Records. We wanted to ask DJ Spooky, aka Paul Miller, a few questions not only about his project and the resurgence in reggae; but also about mash-up culture, copyright law and creativity.

* There’s a lot of genres with huge libraries out there – what attracted you to Trojan’s catalog?

Trojan set the tone for alot of dj’s out there. Aside from Chris Blackwells Island Records, they were probably one of the best known Jamaican labels – the funny thing is that they both started out of the same warehouse in London, and everything went from there. I collect old records, so the basic vibe for me was to figure out how to flip the material to showcase alot of producers techniques. Lee "scratch" Perry and King Tubby were masters of the dub tradition, but Perry also produced alot of Bob Marley, so how do you balance that? The list goes on, but you get the idea: alot of hip-hop came out of the same time period, and I just wanted to focus on the origins of the styles.

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