Over on his blog, industry commentator Om Malik considers the medium term future of TV and suggests that linear Cable TV programming will be diminshed by a consumer switch to on-demand services combined with the re-establishment of traditional broadcasters.Five years from now, the TV market will no longer be segmented solely by major broadcast network vs. cable network viewership.... That said, within this linear/broadcast segment there will be a mini-disruption in the near term. To be specific, it is likely that most of the hundreds of channels we get today via our cable & satellite subscriptions will disappear and there will be only 10 to 20 “broadcast channels” left standing.

Over on his blog, industry commentator Om Malik considers the medium term future of TV and suggests that linear Cable TV programming will be diminshed by a consumer switch to on-demand services combined with the re-establishment of traditional broadcasters.

Five years from now, the TV market will no longer be segmented solely by major broadcast network vs. cable network viewership. Instead, the market will be further subdivided among viewers of linear broadcast programming vs. that of non-linear on-demand formats. Moreover, the on-demand segment will account for a steadily increasing share of total viewership. On the flip side, it’s equally important to note that the segment with traditional linear/broadcast programming (while declining) will continue to remain alive with its own significant share for quite some time. That said, within this linear/broadcast segment there will be a mini-disruption in the near term. To be specific, it is likely that most of the hundreds of channels we get today via our cable & satellite subscriptions will disappear and there will be only 10 to 20 “broadcast channels” left standing. Here’s why…

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