This post is by Britta Knueppel and Chloe Williams. What does the term 'Made In' really mean anymore? As corporations become global - and may even be run in countries...

This post is by Britta Knueppel and Chloe Williams.

What does the term ‘Made In' really mean anymore? As corporations become global – and may even be run in countries away from the one they were born in – how relevant is the tag today and why do some companies cling on to a sense of nationality?

Country of Birth When it comes to characterising a country, beyond their flags and national airlines, consumers typically start to list products and brands. Countries have become synonymous with certain products or categories. Germany is associated with the car industry, conjuring up images of Mercedes, BMWs and Audis, all intrinsically German. Being German has come to represent quality, engineering precision and technical innovation. France is commercially characterised by its high-end luxury goods: Hermes, Louis Vuitton, Chanel and Moët & Chandon. Japan is renowned for its electronic products and technological innovations, with brands such as Sony, Nintendo and Honda all founded there. While more recently Spain has become known for its cheap chic fashion brands such as Zara and Mango.

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