In Brief

The recent issue of Archfarm features an intriguing article by New York architect Peter Yeadon entitled Small is Big: The Dawn of a New Epoch. The articles focus is on...

The recent issue of Archfarm features an intriguing article by New York architect Peter Yeadon entitled "Small is Big: The Dawn of a New Epoch."  The articles focus is on the recent advances in nanotechnology and the potential applications it holds in engineering, design, and architecture. 

Recent developments at both Rice University and Dartmouth have galvanized enthusiasm within the field. In 2005, researchers at Dartmouth announced that they had created the world’s smallest robot – a controllable vehicle capable of going in any direction and only as wide as a single stand of hair.  But only weeks later, scientists at Rice announced that they too had created a remotely controlled tiny robot capable of driving on a flat surface. However, their robotic device, “which they call a nanocar, was made of a singe molecule and was only a billionth of the dimensional area of the microbot that was built at Dartmouth.  At three by four nanometers, the Rice nanocar is about as wide as a single DNA.”   

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