new raveA couple of months ago PSFK reported on a burst of illegal raves around Britain - something that smelled to us like 1989 all over again. Now, The Times reports on the rebirth of rave for the noughties.

A couple of months ago PSFK reported on a burst of illegal raves around Britain – something that smelled to us like 1989 all over again. Now, Paul Flynn in The Times reports on the rebirth of rave for the noughties.

From its inception at the end of the 1980s, “old rave” (as it is now called) gradually degenerated into a dreary free-party scene, where men of a certain age cavort to increasingly chin-stroking dance music. But the early spirit of rave never died; it was just waiting for its time to come round again. New rave is a second coming: not just a throwback to the lawless euphoria of its golden age, but an aesthetic focus for a new generation of club kids, artists, fashion students and night-time celebrities who just want to dress up and get down.

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