Much like the full circle that Robert Putnam’s argument about America’s social capital appears to have made (Bowling Alone of 2000 argued that there has been an unprecedented collapse in...

Much like the full circle that Robert Putnam’s argument about America’s social capital appears to have made (Bowling Alone of 2000 argued that there has been an unprecedented collapse in America’s social capital, whereas 2003’s Better Together documented examples of communities coming together), the cynics who have been claiming that the digital age is destroying social interaction are being continually faced with this Web 2.0 thing that is not only channelling but facilitating and enabling the kind of social interaction – even if it is virtual – that has never been possible before.

READ THIS ARTICLE FOR $15
$15 provides access to this article and every case-study, interview, and analysis piece that we publish for the next 30 days. Our Premium Subscription also provides access to a database of over 100,000 articles on innovation in brand, customer, and retail experience.
Already a subscriber? Log in