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Children’s Machine Implementation Debate

Children’s Machine Implementation Debate
technology

The Children’s Machine (formerly known as 2B1, X0-1 and the $100 laptop), brainchild of MIT Media Lab, is inching towards completion. At CES 2007, attendees were able to demo the...

Allison Mooney
  • 15 january 2007

The Children’s Machine (formerly known as 2B1, X0-1 and the $100 laptop), brainchild of MIT Media Lab, is inching towards completion. At CES 2007, attendees were able to demo the green machine, which is expected to roll out this summer (here’s a slideshow from TG daily). Within the past month, Rwanda and Uruguay announced their participation, bringing the country count up to 14. Now, Australia says it is testing the waters.

Amidst all the buzz, though, skeptics worry that the implementation plans being outlined are unrealistic. $100 does not factor in training costs, hardware and software maintenance, as well as internet access. One estimate from Jon Carnfield of OLPC News brings the bill up to over $970. Meanwhile, according to OLPC News, Libya is earmarking $208 per laptop and a Brazilian professor puts his country’s cost at $235. The debate has spilled onto Slashdot and Newsforge as well. Think you can solve the problem? OLPC News is soliciting implementation plans for Nepal.

OLPC News Implementation Plan Coverage

Related PSFK articles: The $100 Green Laptop

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